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Who invented the following products: shampoo, conditioner and dental floss?

Question #117730. Asked by Jazmee27.

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Matthew_07 star
Answer has 4 votes
Matthew_07 star
16 year member
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Answer has 4 votes.
Levi Spear Parmly, a dentist from New Orleans, is credited with inventing the first form of dental floss. He recommended that people should clean their teeth with silk floss in 1815.

link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_floss#History

Sep 23 2010, 10:12 AM
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Answer has 6 votes.

Currently voted the best answer.
The word shampoo in English is derived from Hindi chāmpo (चाँपो [tʃãːpoː]), and dates to 1762. The Hindi word referred to head massage, usually with some form of hair oil. Similar words also occur in other North Indian languages. The word and the service of head massage were introduced to Britain by a Bengali entrepreneur Sake Dean Mahomed. Dean Mahomed introduced the practice to Basil Cochrane's vapour baths while working there in London in the early 1800s, and later, together with his Irish wife, opened "Mahomed's Steam and Vapour Sea Water Medicated Baths" in Brighton, England. His baths were like Turkish baths where clients received an Indian treatment of champi (shampooing), meaning therapeutic massage. He was appointed ‘Shampooing Surgeon’ to both George IV and William IV.

link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shampoo#History
In the 1860s, the meaning of the word shifted from the sense of massage to that of applying soap to the hair.[5] Earlier, ordinary soap had been used for washing hair.[6] However, the dull film soap left on the hair made it uncomfortable, irritating, and unhealthy looking.

During the early stages of shampoo, English hair stylists boiled shaved soap in water and added herbs to give the hair shine and fragrance. Kasey Hebert was the first known maker of shampoo, and the origin is currently attributed to him. Commercially made shampoo was available from the turn of the century. A 1914 ad for Canthrox Shampoo in American Magazine showed young women at camp washing their hair with Canthrox in a lake; magazine ads in 1914 by Rexall featured Harmony Hair Beautifier and Shampoo.

link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shampoo#History

Sep 23 2010, 11:22 AM
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Answer has 3 votes
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Answer has 3 votes.
For centuries, natural oils have been used to condition human hair. These natural products are still used today, including essential oils such as tea tree oil and carrier oils such as jojoba oil. A conditioner popular with men in the late Victorian era was Macassar oil, but this product was quite greasy and required pinning a small cloth, known as an antimacassar, to chairs and sofas to keep the upholstery from being damaged by the Macassar oil.

Modern hair conditioner was created at the turn of the twentieth century when well-known perfumer Ed. Pinaud presented a product he called brilliantine at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris. His product was intended to soften men's hair, including beards and mustaches. Since the invention of Pinaud's early products, modern science has advanced the hair conditioner industry to include those made with silicone, fatty alcohols, and quaternary ammonium compounds. These chemical products allow the benefits of hair conditioner without feeling greasy or heavy.

link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_conditioner

Sep 24 2010, 12:59 AM
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