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What are the dimensions and weight of a hockey puck?

Question #13343. Asked by Dean.
Last updated Aug 19 2016.

shantaram
Answer has 7 votes
shantaram
23 year member
188 replies

Answer has 7 votes.
Made of vulcanized rubber, the puck is 1 inch thick and 3 inches in diameter (2.5 cm 7.6 cm) and weighs 5.5 to 6 ounces (156 to 170 grams).---from encyclopaedia Britannica

Aug 10 2001, 12:25 PM
xfacilitatorx
Answer has 8 votes
Currently Best Answer
xfacilitatorx

Answer has 8 votes.

Currently voted the best answer.
Hockey puck
A puck is a vulcanized, hard rubber disk used in ice hockey, one inch thick (25.4 mm) and 3 inches in diameter (76.2 mm), and weighing between 5.5 to 6 oz (156-170 g). It is frozen a few hours before the game to prevent bouncing. Pucks can reach speed of 100 mph (160 km/h) when hit by players' sticks, and spectators at hockey games are occasionally injured. On March 18, 2002, a thirteen year old girl, Brittany Cecil, was killed by a hockey puck at a Columbus Blue Jackets game.

link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hockey_puck#In_ice_hockey

Response last updated by CmdrK on Aug 19 2016.
Apr 16 2006, 11:02 PM
jimmyrussell23
Answer has 3 votes
jimmyrussell23
17 year member
21 replies

Answer has 3 votes.
Ice hockey evolved from field hockey played on ice surfaces in Canada. The early players found that the rubber ball used in field hockey was far too active on the hard ice surface, so they cut off the top and bottom of the ball to form the hockey puck.

Apr 17 2006, 1:19 AM
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